The Right Age

It's really never too early to see an orthodontist. Although many children will not start orthodontic treatment until nine to twelve years old, some children benefit greatly from early intervention around age six to eight. Orthodontists today can successfully correct most problems regardless of the patient’s age. But that does not mean that the orthodontic treatment starting age does not matter. In fact it may play a significant role in the total time and expenses required for the completion of the orthodontic treatment.

Early Intervention

It's best for the orthodontist to see children by age 7 to advise if orthodontic treatment is required and the best time for that patient to be treated. The first permanent molars and incisors have usually come in by that time and crossbites, crowding and other problems can be evaluated. When treatment is begun early, Dr. Bobby can guide the growth of the jaw and guide incoming permanent teeth. Early treatment can also regulate the width of the upper and lower dental arches, gain space for permanent teeth, avoid the need for permanent tooth extractions, reduce likelihood of impacted permanent teeth, correct thumb-sucking, and eliminate abnormal swallowing or speech problems. In other words, early treatment can simplify later treatment.

Adolescent Treatment

Most orthodontic problems are ideally treated during this time. Usually, all or most permanent teeth are erupted and patients are at one of their most active phases of growth. This is a great time to correct most problems, as the jaws are actively growing and their growth can be most easily modified during this time. In order to minimize patient involvement during the treatment process, we will work very hard to maximize ideal treatment goals with his adolescent patients.

Adult Treatment

Orthodontic care has come a long way since the all metal braces of your youth. Many adults are finally treating themselves to the straight, beautiful smile they've always wanted. Our private room gives adults comfort and privacy.